Transition

Student graduating from high school.

(From TennesseeWorks)

What Does High-Quality Transition Assessment and Planning Mean?

During high school, students, educators, families, and other members of the educational team begin the important task of developing a transition plan outlining the student’s postsecondary goals along with the educational services, supports, and linkages that will help him or her achieve those goals. Age-appropriate transition assessments are used to help identify which transition services are most essential for a particular student. Each student’s transition plan should be unique and tailored to the individual strengths, needs, interests, skills, and strengths of the student. At the same time, each plan should create a pathway for students to move from high school to valued adult roles, including work.

As Yogi Berra said, “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you are going because you might not get there.” A relevant and well-designed transition plan is crucial to ensuring students access the instruction, experiences, and supports they need to prepare for a good job or further education after high school. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act requires the IEPs of transition-age students to outline (1) appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills; and (2) the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals.

Why is High-Quality Transition Assessment Planning Important?

Despite the importance of involving students actively in this assessment and planning process (Carter, Brock, & Trainor, in press; Wehman, 2011), many teachers struggle to carry out transition planning in ways that fully engage youth, families, and other professionals in the process. Yet, the planning process itself is critical to transition success. For example, when young people are actively involved in writing their own transition plan, they are developing self-determination and self-advocacy skills. Unfortunately, almost one quarter of youth with an intellectual disability or autism are not even present at their own transition planning and nearly half participate minimally when they are present (Shogren & Plotner, 2012).

 How Do I Write a High-Quality Transition Plan?

Although transition planning should begin by age 14 (or earlier) in the state of Tennessee, the transition plan is not a static document. Instead, it evolves each year to match the emerging needs and goals of the young person. Opportunities for community-based work experience are an integral piece of the transition plan. Concrete goals and steps towards achieving those goals should be clearly outlined within the plan and based upon transition assessments. Quality transition planning involves the young person in developing their own transition plan. If young people feel as though their voice is included in their transition plan, they may be more likely be committed to the identified goals and steps.

Where Can I Learn More About Transition Assessment and Planning?

The following links include guides, stories, and other resources related to effective transition planning for employment among young people with IDD:

goals.

4 young women, including one young woman with Down syndrome, playing golf.

Transition Overview Document

Download the Transition Overview Document [link]. Learn from the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) and the Kentucky Office of Vocational ...
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Image of course content

Module—Transition 103: Endless Possibility – Preparing High School Students with Disabilities for Successful Transition to Employment

Benefits 103: Endless Possibility - Preparing High School Students with Disabilities for Successful Transition to Employment This course reviews preparation ...
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Cover image of Transition 101 module

Module—Transition 101: What We All Need to Know About Transition for Students with Significant Disabilities

Transition 101: What We All Need to Know About Transition for Students with Significant Disabilities Take course for credit. Transition ...
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Pacer Parent Center web image

PACER’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment

PACER’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment [link] Offers parents, youth, and professionals, easy to use information on a ...
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Pacer Smooth Transition web image

Making a Smooth Transition from High School to Adult Living: Successful Collaboration

Making a Smooth Transition from High School to Adult Living: Successful Collaboration [link] This webinar for parents of youth with ...
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Community-Based Work Transition Program webpage photo

Community-Based Work Transition Program

Community-Based Work Transition Program [link] Helps students get skills and training to find jobs starting the last two years of ...
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Kentucky Post School Outcomes web page

Kentucky Post School Outcome Study (KyPSO)

Kentucky Post School Outcome Study (KyPSO) [link] Gives a survey at the end of high school for youth with IEP ...
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Charting the Life Course: Daily Life and Employment booklet

Charting the Life Course: Daily Life and Employment booklet

Charting the Life Course: Daily Life and Employment booklet [link] Booklet about planning to become an adult in your daily ...
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Charting the Life Course: Transition to Adulthood booklet

Charting the Life Course: Transition to Adulthood booklet

Charting the Life Course: Transition to Adulthood booklet [link] Booklet about how to become an adult in many different areas ...
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FYI Transition

FYI Transition

FYI Transition [link] Videos and online course about transition for students with disabilities ...
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Center for Parent Information and Resources

Center for Parent Information and Resources

Center for Parent Information and Resources [link] Gives lots of information about transition and other websites to help you. Email: ...
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